Saint Paul’s Nursery School
August 1976

 

 

Dear Mr. and Mrs. Patrick,

 

            Summer is almost over and Charles will be on his way to kindergarten. I hope he is looking forward to it. It seems like I should have seen you at the beach, more than once, this year and perhaps I will see again, before the summer is over.           

For the most part, I think Charles had a good year at St. Paul’s.  By the end of the year, we felt Charles had gained dependency on the group and the teachers, rather than the small group of friends and devices he had earlier depended on for relaxation and security. He began to reach out into new activities, on his own, self directed and motivated. Charles had developed rhythm in his daily habits, and appears very happy and content. Naturally, we were so pleased.

            Charles shows good control. He is neither under active nor over active—quite predictable. His motor skills are adequate for his age; his language skills more advanced (vocabulary, diction, sentence structure, etc.). He frequently contributed to group discussion and is a talker when close to friends, to the point of being distracted.

            By the last few months, Charles appeared interested in many more activities, than building with blocks. In fact, he did less block building and centered his play around the art media (paint, clay, crayons, etc.) to express creativity and more play with the small manipulative games and toys. He is very conscientious and usually cooperative. He appeared quite persistent.

            Charles seems to move cautiously in many directions. He did not adapt easily to new surroundings or people and my hunch is that he may always be that way. The anxiousness he feels is expressed the moment he feels things have changed. We knew when things were not right for Charles, almost immediately, when we looked at him. My experience has taught me that children who are cautions and excel academically or can achieve easily are better students than those who are bright but jump into every situation, without thinking.

            I do think Charles should do well in school. He is a thinker – curious and enthusiastic about learning. In many ways, Charles was a challenge to us, in September. We wanted so much for him to share with the group and feel comfortable enough to learn what we had to share with him. I feel we succeeded, I hope so, the change we noticed in May and June in Charles’s general feeling of well being more than please us.

            Do bring him back to visit. Hope to see you soon.

 

Aileen Quinty

 

Saint Paul’s Nursery School
Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church